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Accreditation

MLA's Accreditation Scheme sets nationally agreed standards for museums in the UK. The Standard supports museums in identifying opportunities for further improvement and development. There are currently over 1,800 museums participating in the Scheme, demonstrating their commitment to managing collections effectively for the enjoyment of our communities.

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Digital

Technology has had an important impact on almost every aspect of museum life, from managing the collection to the visitor experience, whether at home, in school, in gallery or on the move.

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Participation

Make the most of this portal by reading our introduction which will help you navigate, search and browse.

Welcome to the participation portal. Whether you are new to the field or a veteran participation practitioner there should be something here to support your work or develop your interests.

We will be adding to this introduction as the portal develops so check regularly for updates.

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10 Steps to a Digital Asset Management Strategy PDF

Collections Trust CEO Nick Poole reports from the 11th meeting of the European Member States Expert Group on Digitisation and Digital Preservation, which takes place twice a year in the European Parliament building in Gasperich, Luxembourg.

In recent years, my twice-yearly pilgrimage to Gasperich has been, if not a chore then, perhaps, a little predictable. The group brings together national experts from all 27 EU Member States to review and make recommendations on the European Commission's recommendations on digitisation, which the UK signed up to under Culture Secretary David Lammy in 2006 and which were updated and reinforced on the 27th October 2011. Discussions usually focus on Europeana, funding and the progress of national strategies for Digitisation (updating the UK position is easy - we don't have one).


This chapter forms part of the Mayor's Commission on African and Asian Heritage: delivering shared heritage, 2005 and is useful for both practitioners and communities who want to enter into partnerships built on trust and openness.

This chapter forms part of the Mayor's Commission on African and Asian Heritage: delivering shared heritage, 2005 and is useful for both practitioners and communities who want to enter into partnerships built on trust and openness.

As at June 1st, 2014 a set of new exceptions to copyright came into force under UK law designed to enable specific cultural heritage activities, including:

  • Copying to support research and private study
  • Text and data-mining
  • Ecuation and teaching
  • Archiving and preservation
  • Public administration
  • Accessible formats for disabled people

These exceptions are likely to make it significantly easier for cultural heritage institutions to carry out their public task to preserve and share heritage material. It does not, however, represent a blanket indemnification for all cultural activities and the majority of uses are still likely to require explicit permission from copyright holders. 

To help cultural heritage institutions understand the scope of the exceptions, the UK Intellectual Property Office has published a free guide 'Exceptions to Copyright: Libraries, Archives and Museums'.

Museums and cultural heritage organisations are discovering the power of 3D and virtual reality to open up access to their collections for new audiences.


This 2002 evaluation report is an inspiring account of the innovative and ambitious Open Museum project, Glasgow. It was the first Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) evaluation report to gather qualitative evidence based on social and economic outcomes. It demonstrates how museum outreach can be developed as a core way of working and discusses the challenges and successes.

A publication by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport: Charitable Museums and Galleries.

A good practice guide to continuous professional development (CPD) for collections management

 

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UK Medical Collections Group's how-to guide for developing and delivering film-making projects with adult learners.

The attached PDF is a Guide to Selecting a Review Methodology for Collections Rationalisation


If you are facilitating or engaging in participatory practice you should understand what it is and where it comes from- this is a seminal text. Notwithstanding scores of critiques and adaptions Arnstein’s work is still relevant.
Citizen participation grew out of public planning initiatives. Arnstein developed the ladder of participation in the US in 1969 and since then it has become a practitioner and academic touchstone in vast array of fields from regeneration to child studies; it’s possible to transpose the framework into different contexts.

Comprehensive and authoritative, this guide by leading IPR expert David Green has been published by the Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN) to provide detailed guidance on Digital Rights and their management in a museum context.

Read more about the resource on this website (external link)

The purpose of this guide is to address some of the barriers to schools using museums which were identified in research carried out in 2004 for the Education Programme Delivery Plan (EPDP). It is focused on resources for school age children (aged 5 - 16) but also highlights work with pre-school children, out of school activities and family learning.

Read more about the resource on this website (external link)

Checklist of acceptable evidence for due diligence, an aid to acquiring a cultural object with confidence.

A questionnaire is for organisations that wish to apply for Accredited status. Existing participants do not need to complete this form. The specific eligibility criteria are published within the Accreditation Standard (2011).

This document offers guidance relating to the Accreditation Standard, section two - collections. This second version of the section two guidance has been published after reviewing comments from museum practitioners collected during 2012. Elements which have been revised are clearly highlighted. The Accreditation Standard itself has not changed.

This document offers introductory guidance relating to the Accreditation Standard. This second version of the introductory guidance has been published after reviewing comments from museum practitioners collected during 2012. Elements which have been revised are clearly highlighted. The Accreditation Standard itself has not changed.

This document offers guidance relating to the Accreditation Standard, section one - organisational health. This second version of the section one guidance has been published after reviewing comments from museum practitioners collected during 2012. Elements which have been revised are clearly highlighted. The Accreditation Standard itself has not changed.

A print friendly version is available on the Arts Council's website: http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/supporting-museums/accreditation-scheme/guidance-documents/.

Read more about the resource on this website (external link)

This document offers guidance relating to the Accreditation Standard, section three - users and their experiences. This second version of the section three guidance has been published after reviewing comments from museum practitioners collected during 2012. Elements which have been revised are clearly highlighted. The Accreditation Standard itself has not changed.

A print friendly version is available on the Arts Council's website: http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/supporting-museums/accreditation-scheme/guidance-documents/.

Read more about the resource on this website (external link)

A document providing on the requirements of the Accreditation Standard (2011 edition):

1.2 Acceptable Constitution for the Governing Body: Accredited museums are long-term organisations which exist to benefit the public and safeguard relevant collections. They have an appropriate and acceptable constitution for the governing body.

A list of resources for museums and galleries working towards an application for Accredited status or existing Accredited Museums.

Read more about the resource on this website (external link)

The Accreditation Scheme sets nationally agreed standards for museums in the UK. There are currently just under 1,800 museums participating in the scheme, demonstrating their commitment to managing collections effectively for the enjoyment and benefit of users.

Accreditation enables museums and governing bodies to assess their current performance, and it supports them in planning and developing their services.

The scheme is administered by Arts Council England in partnership with CyMAL: Museum, Archives, Libraries Wales; Museums Galleries Scotland and the Northern Ireland Museum Council.

This is the Welsh language version of the Accreditation standard, published 3 October 2011 (web version, suitable for printing).


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Bibliography

Author: Arts Council England
Publisher: Arts Council England
Publication date: 03-10-2011

The Accreditation Scheme sets nationally agreed standards for museums in the UK. There are currently just under 1,800 museums participating in the scheme, demonstrating their commitment to managing collections effectively for the enjoyment and benefit of users.

Accreditation enables museums and governing bodies to assess their current performance, and it supports them in planning and developing their services.

The scheme is administered by Arts Council England in partnership with CyMAL: Museum, Archives, Libraries Wales; Museums Galleries Scotland and the Northern Ireland Museum Council.

This is the English language version of the Accreditation standard, published 3 October 2011 (web version, suitable for printing).


Download

Bibliography

Author: Arts Council England
Publisher: Arts Council England
Publication date: 03-10-2011

The Accreditation Standard states organisational health as one of three sections that a museum must meet to gain Accreditation. Below are links to the resources that will support you through the Organisational Health section.

Organisational Health general resources

Organisational Health / 1.3 Appropriate Management Arrangements

Organisational Health / 1.4 Effective Forward Planning

Organisational Health / 1.7 Appropriate workforce

Organisational Health / 1.9 Clear, workable emergency plan

 

Collections are central to the functions of a museum and form one of three sections of the Standard that museums must meet to gain Accreditation. Below are links to resources that will support you through the Collections section of the Accreditation Scheme.

Collections: general resources

2.1 satisfactory arrangements for the ownership of collections

Collections Management Policies

Collections Management Policies / 2.2 Development Policy

Collections Management Policies / 2.3 Documentation Policy

Collections Management Policies / 2.4 Care and Conservation Policy

Collections Management Plans

Collections Management Plans / 2.5 Documentation Plan

Collections Management Plans / 2.6 Care and Conservation Plan

Collections Management Procedures – general

Collections / 2.7 Documentation Procedures

Collections / 2.8 Expert assessment of security arrangements

Accreditation states that 'a museum must offer and develop good-quality, stimulating services for users and potential users, in order to get the best out of its collections, resources and local area'. Users and Their Experience forms one of three sections of the Standard that museums must meet to gain Accreditation. Below are links to resources that will support you through the Users and Their Experience section.

3.1 Good quality services and development / 3.1.5 access to collections

3.3 Effective learning experiences

This template sets out the principles that will provide the governing bodies and the workforce of museums with a framework for responsible and ethical acquisition and disposal of collections. It provides clear procedures and decision-making processes common to Accredited museums.

Read more about the resource on this website (external link)


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Bibliography

Author: Arts Council England
Publisher: Arts Council England
Publication date: 16-12-2011

This fact sheet provides updated guidance on the Acquisition procedure in SPECTRUM 4.0


This website is useful for any heritage professional working with children or young people to make positive change in their community. The site is designed to be used by a group of children or young people working together.

This workbook develops children and young people’s knowledge and skills to take effective action and make change happen. It is informed by the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child; the International human rights framework promoting active participation of children and young people to help secure their rights to a fulfilling, safe and secure upbringing.

First Steps

It needs to be established that the object has actually been stolen or damaged either intentionally or accidentally. In cases of suspected theft enquiry needs to be made to ensure that it has not been removed from display for cleaning, renovation, study or change of exhibition without proper notification. A search of the premises may show that the item has been removed from display and hidden to be collected later.

Museums Galleries Scotland: Advice Sheet from MGS describing the threats to paper collections, which may include fine art on paper; archive materials in the form of letters, diaries and documents; maps and plans. Outlines the chief threats to paper collections -- environment; pests; people; contact materials -- and suggests ways of preventing damage from one or more of them.

Museums Galleries Scotland's Advice Sheet describing basic types of air pollution: acidic and oxidising subtances; particulate pollutants, and how to protect museum collections from damage caused by them.

Museums Galleries Scotland's Advice Sheet explaining what collection care is, the reasons behind it, why it is important, the activities involved and the responsibilities of museum managers and/or trustees.

Imagine being able to see artwork in the greatest museums around the world without leaving your chair. Driven by his passion for art, Amit Sood tells the story of how he developed Art Project to let people do just that.

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